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will drive calf too, that's where the energy needs to be put. that's where the biggest bang for the buck will be in the business because, remember, as we looked at these more than minor changes in the financials of the telephone companies across the country, it was so important that we do these two things coi understand didn'tly. -- coincidentally. we got out of sync, one down efficiently and fast. we just have to work the usf thing, and it's about the consumer. >> host: jeff gardner, president and ceo of the windstream corporation. he is also chairman this year of the u.s. telecom trade association. he's been our guest on "the communicators" along with paul barbagallo of bloomberg. gentlemen, thank you. >> guest: thank you.Ñsr >> next, the interim america dialogue discusses the results of the november 6th elections and implications for latin america. panelists discuss the prospects for change with the obama add enrings' policies involving immigration, trade, drug policy, and economic cooperation. this is about an hour and ten minutes. >> this morning, we're going to have a conversation
but continuing with the theme of abundance, we will see the development of an energy surplus because of technological advances in exploiting both oil and natural gas resources, combined with new energy efficiency measures that will greatly reduce u.s. energy use. now the u.s. is now predicted, the international energy agency, predicts the u.s. will be the, will be the number one producer of oil by 2020. it will also be probably close to the top in the producers of natural gas. this will give us the wealth and income, mike lindh mentioned -- lind, mentioned 1 1/2% of gdp, we have 16 to 20 years to make up for the short fall in, in social security and 4 to 5% in medicare. well, the explosion of a moving from a energy deficit to a energy surplus will more than half close that gdp gap. so, we have a economic conditions that suggest that the challenges we face are the exact opposite of what the bowles-simpson grand bargain would impose on us as a growth strategy. the conditions that we're going to face over the next five to eight years with some amelioration if we do the right things are
energy was spent on health care and other things coming into the question is do you see that -- how do you strike that balance and do you see that changing as you go forward into the next four years? >> to complicate your questions about what the balance in the short term and the immediate and long-term things that matter for the strength of the economy and i think it's important to recognize that as we get to the next phase of the fiscal reform debate you have to think about this not just about how you bring them down gradually to the point they are sustainable you to think about it in terms of what can you do to improve the long-term growth in the american economy? there are things we have to do in infrastructure and education just to name to that are important to the potential of the country and are not very expensive. if we sacrifice those objectives in the interest of getting more fiscal restraint more quickly than is desirable would do damage across the country, so i would just encourage people to look at -- we want to look at things that are good for growth now and over the long
that are important for queer communities -- the energy that we are putting around marriage equality issue. >> this is an important question. issues of employment discrimination are critically important. even things like health care disparity, if you will, the reality of where lbgt people are, it is not quite clear and it doesn't bubble up to what is being talked about right now. because marriage equality had been at the forefront. and i do think in some ways, it is why the national gays and lesbians have spent so much time trying to broaden this to make sure that transgendered people in those issues are included in all the work that we do. it is widely thought very hard to make sure that gender identity is included in the employment nondiscrimination act. because we could go the other way with incremental progress with his progress. but we would've left out a whole swath of the community. folks who have greater experiences of discrimination, violence is still an issue. we forget that people are still being violently attacked because of who they are and because of who they love. i think a
frequency are we using in the electronic magnetic spectrum. how much energy are we putting out? are people measuring it? do we know what we need to know about that? the answer was we did a pretty good job at one time during the cold war. some of you may remember emission control. that was a consistent effort we had. not so much now. frankly, we haven't had to do that. we need do what i guess i would call take care of our electromagnetic high gene to know how much are we putting out there that is being picked. what frequency? why do we use the frequency do. can we hop frequency as we build new systems? it will be important 39 potential adversaries and new systems that are coming in that measure that. troping magnetic spectrum is important. we need to sustain the undersea domino the undersea domain. a that's continuing a networking-approach. it's it's important have submarines. they are a main part in the undersea domain. that's a matter of having systems. it's pa aircraft, it's surface ships with the appropriate sonar and rays, it's fixed system on the bottom. it's un-- unmanned underwater
and take your, take your energy? that is -- information. that is example of unfairness. we brought 100 examples of spam cases many based on unfairness. 40 data security cases using unfairness. those are examples where i think you want us to use this statute. this is a statute that congress gave us in 1939 to prohibit unfair deceptive acts or practices. >> wyndham case is fair example. it didn't protect their credit card data. >> what we allege, yes. >> 500,000 credit card numbers ended up in the hands of a russian company. >> can neither confirm or deny that. that is certainly the allegation. i don't think even they deny it. >> i guess you brought that. >> involving multiple hacks. not first time or second time. perhaps as many as three. >> one thing i wonder about, one criticism of the ftc you didn't do anything to google for their overcollection of wi-fi information and i don't know how much you can say about that by that, part of the problem there was they didn't say they wouldn't do it. so it wasn't deceptive. they never said i'm not going to collect everybody's information over wi
. presumably they felt they could win and they spent the time energy and money to put on the ballot that because the coalition when they would come out with a religious argument with you saw were fair-minded religious leaders standing up countering what they were saying and that's something we haven't seen as aggressively in the past. they also are simply losing support. i was on a panel today and this was much more exciting with brian browner once the national organization for marriage and he is desperately spinning and he talks about the state that he talks about how they were outspent this time. they had seen their support shrank. they're not going to go away and they will learn their lessons and i agree with patrick. i think they could come back in a very forceful way that they have seen their support shrank. they have seen their grassroots support strank strength in their donor base shrink. the mormon church is a player we did not see in these campaigns. they were the dominant player in prop 8. you also saw a lot of individual donors on that side that were not there this time w
've spent the the time and energy to put them on about. because of the coalitions, and with them come out with the religious are you what you saw were fair-minded religious leaders and faith leaders in the accounting what they were sent to that something that we have seen as aggressively in the past. they also are losing support. you were saying, i was on a panel today, this is much more exciting with brian brown who runs the national organization for marriage, and he is desperately spinning, and he talks about the left liberal states but he also talks about how they were outspent this thing. well, they have seen their support shrink. a have seen can be are not going to go away and they learn the lessons. i think they could come back in a very force away, but it seemed their support shrink the they've seen their grassroots support shrink and they've seen their donor base shrink. the mormon church is a play that you did not see in these four campaigns but they were the dominant player in prop eight. also saw a lot of individual donors on the outside. not do this thing. where's on the proto
-term recovery was at the stimulus really did begin this long-term reinvestment. it was by far the largest energy bill in the history of the country. we been spending a few billion dollars a year. the stimulus port and 90 billion, just a complete game changer for wind, solar and other renewables, energy efficiency and every imaginable form. [applause] i got for saying he thinks. for this marker, electric vehicles, biofuels, clean energy research and the technologies of tomorrow and factories to build the stuff in the united states. not just energy, but the stimulus is going to drag our antiquated health care system into the digital era so that your doctor might not kill you at this chicken scratch handwriting by 2015 just about every american will have an electronic medical record, which really should improve care and reduce costs and is really a down payment on health care reform. this included the most ambitious education reform in decades with race to the top of the largest infrastructure investment since eisenhower. it had the largest research investment other, the largest middle-class tax cu
and maryland and washington. they thought they could win them or they would not have spent the time and energy and money to put him on the ballot. but because of the coalition, what you saw was fair-minded legislators standing up, countering what they were saying, and that's something we haven't seen has aggressively in the past. they are also simply losing support. this is much more exciting, with brian brown, who runs the organization -- the national organization for marriage. and he talks about how they were outspent this time. they have seen their support true. they are not going to go away. i agree with patrick, i think they could come back in a forceful way. but they have seen their support shrink and their grassroots support shrink and they have seen their donor base train. the mormon church as a player he did not see in this campaign. they were the dominant player and you also saw a a lot of the individual donors on that side, where is on the pro-quality side, you saw fair-minded people across the board standing up and campaigning for these initiatives on our side, and also digging dee
what frequencies are we using the electronic magnetic spectrum? how much energy are we putting out there? our people measuring it? and do we know what we need to know about that? the answer was you know, we did a pretty good job at this during the cold war some of you may remember the mission control and that was a consistent effort that we had but not so much now because frankly we just haven't had to do that. so we need to do i guess what i would call take care of our electromagnetic hygiene to know how much energy we are putting out there that is being picked up if you will and how we use the frequency, can we hope frequency as we build new systems because it would be important because a lot of our potential lover series and a lot of new systems are coming in that measure exactly that. some electronic magnum and spectrum lenni to understand our dominance in the undersea domain and that is continuing and network approach. it's important to have submarines. they are the main part of dominance in the domain. but it's also a matter of having systems. it is the aircraft, its systems
trust your own judgment, gives you energy like cocaine. shy people become gregarious. it makes you think you can accomplish a lot of famous so think about this publicly. this insight about dopamine, how pleasure raises the neurotransmitter in women, makes them less easy to subordinates and control and put down, pleasure makes women more likely to stand up for themselves. and explained to me a mystery i had been struggling with my entire career as a feminist critic. why the vagina and female desire and sexual already been targeted, mocked, demeaned, derided, in some cultures mutilated for 5,000 years? this is why. if you target the vagina you target the brain. if you support female sexual already use support women's confidence, assertiveness, sense of self-respect. when a woman has an orgasm -- opiates and ecstasy, when she has an organism -- orgasm it releases intimacy and connection. my reading of this cocktail in the female brain is female desire and sexual alan which are often portrayed as demeaning and debasing and making the ludicrous, remarkable, actually raises women's power and e
on energy and commerce. trust but verify. we are not trusting today as you can tell from a line of questioning. and we shouldn't be. that judge in the previous panel talk about contribution to society in the great state of tennessee and his life was lost, but a vicious one how many? were talking about far too many people. so i was just in my last second asked you, dr. hamburg and maybe dr. smith to comment as well, do you think that the fda needs because of this develops a sudden high price change the law so that you are ever succeeds you have says broad authority over the compounding pharmacies across the country who are doing the right thing. they're not manufacturing drugs. they're just trying to provide a service based on a prescription that has to be written. this company was an absolute cricket operation and they kill people. i don't think anybody should get confused between them and the typical compound pharmacy in drugstores across our districts. >> we need a tiered approach in terms of the legislation. i think that clearly the traditional compound or working locally is
after the election. so thank you very much, sir. >> coming up tonight, a house energy and commerce subcommittee hears testimony on the fungal meningitis outbreak linked to a massachusetts company. the defense department and holds a briefing on actions taken after an investigation into misconduct. at laflin air force base in san antonio. that is followed by an interview with outgoing house services member, congressman barney frank. today's of nonfiction books this weekend. your calls, e-mails, and tweets. many featured authors including jake tapper and christopher hitchens book, mortality. live coverage starts on saturday morning at 10:00 a.m. eastern on sunday at noon on c-span2's booktv. join us online
idea and harness some of the energy around the idea and help some of the individual part of the party going forward. i think he'll help them. >> you were with the president in iowa a emotional place for him. he doesn't have anymore campaign ahead of him. give us a short picture what it was like being with him as it was coming to an end. >> he's not a very publicly emotional guy as most people know. he said later that he was struck by the last event. everybody is tired. you're the walking dead. both campaigns. every reporter. you're trying to make it through. but he looked out that night and saw all these faces of a these people who believed with him and with him in 2007. i don't mean random faces. i mean, three or people he actually recognized and knew and kind of waivedded at him and waived back. and that's struck him. i think it impacted him. you could see he got a little emotional. he was reflective as it sounds like romney was as well. i remember morning of the election we were waiting to do the interviews the day of election. he said i thought how about romney and his supporters
years we've seen a dramatic increase in sale of energy drinks in america, common fixtures in grocery stores, gas station, convenience stores, everywhere you turn. they target young people. the flashy ads and names like monster and rock star and with claims to increase attention, stamina and even to help with weight loss. according to one study, 30% to 50% of adolescents, teenagers, consume energy drinks. sadly, as the sale of energy drinks has grown, so has the alarming evidence that these energy drinks pose a potential threat to our nation's health. yesterday "the new york times" featured an article that found that the food and drug administration has received 13 adverse event reports for people who died -- who died -- after consuming 5-hour energy drinks. just last month news reports found that five people died -- five -- after consuming monster energy drinks. this last may i met the mother and family of a 14-year-old, anise fournier from maryland. this lovely young teenager lost her life last december when she went into cardiac arrest caused by caffeine toxicity after she tkrafrpb
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16